Category Archives: health

5 must haves for an EDS pregnancy

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This blog post is sort of the reason I started this project in the first place. I was approached by a few EDSers who are thinking of starting a family or expanding their brood. They asked me to share my experience with them. There is some research out there about EDS and pregnancy but not a whole pile.

Firstly, before you begin trying to conceive, talk to your doctor.

Contrary to what many people believe, EDSers suffering from the hypermobility can experience very normal pregnancies. There are cases of course where labour may spontaneously start before the estimated birth date. It is the vascular type of EDS that causes the real concern amongst doctors. In my case, I developed symphysis pubis dysfunction (spd) very early on in my pregnancy which up until 12 weeks ago, put me in a wheelchair and caused me to use my smart crutches. SPD is fairly common in pregnancies in the general population but because of laxity in the joints already, EDS may produce a severe case.

Anyway, my pregnancy was quite difficult purely because of the pain. The baby and myself were generally in good health up until the day I was induced, but I’ll explain that another time.

So here are the main things that got me through my pregnancy and what I would also suggest to anyone planning on starting a family

1.Get as fit and healthy as possible

We had been trying to conceive for about 6 months when I fell pregnant. During that time I was actively loosing weight. I had put on lots of weight in the previous 8 years, and to take some pressure off my joints, I decided enough was enough. I lost almost 2 stone and I really think that made a huge difference to my fertility. I had also been getting more active, making the effort not to throw myself into bed at the first sign of pain and fatigue. Research also shows that the fitter you are in pregnancy, the easier your labour will be, should you have a straightforward vaginal birth.

2.Support, support and support.

The first and last trimester is tough for a lot of women, never mind anyone with additional issues such as gastroparesis or dysautonomia. It is vital you have a good support system in place, especially if this is a subsequent pregnancy and you have other children to care for. Luckily, my husband is at home full time so I could rest when I needed to. I know not everyone can afford a situation like ours.
If you have family or friends who are willing to help out by cooking, cleaning or looking after other children, take their help. Grab any offers with both hands and don’t be afraid to ask for help!

Make sure you have support from your health care professionals too. Both your GP and obstetrician should be made aware of your conditions and any meds you might be on. You should also talk to your GP about Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy to help you cope during pregnancy if you don’t already have therapists in place.

It’s funny, some women with EDS greatly improve during pregnancy while others’ symptoms get worse. Pregnancy can increase laxity and therefore the incidence of injury may increase. Investing in some supports or mobility aids can make day to day life a little easier. It can often mean the difference between getting out of the house or looking at the same four walls for days on end. My smart crutches and wheelchair were a Godsend. I also had a belt to support my pelvis, it made the area feel more stable.

3. Relaxation and rest

Pregnancy is hard on the body, fatigue has been one of the biggest complaints I’ve heard from other women with EDS. The tiniest chore may mean spending the rest of the day in bed. While it is important to stay active as much as possible, it is also important, particularly for EDSers to get plenty of rest. Listen to your body! Cleaning the kitchen cupboards might sound like a great idea to a nesting mom but will it be worth spending the next few days in bed? Save your spoons for your doctors appointment or lunch with your friends.

Your friends might want to throw you a baby shower but if you’re having a particularly bad episode of fatigue or a pain flare up, being the centre of attention may not be your thing. Suggest a chill out girly day at home, binging on Netflix and sweets or a spa day. My Dad’s girlfriend took me to a spa during my pregnancy. It was my first time having a massage (I’m 28) so you can imagine how much I looked forward to it. Although it was very relaxing, it did require spoons. I slept a lot the next day.

4. Creature comforts

Pyjamas, Netflix subscription, a good book. There will be bed days, it’s inevitable, so be prepared. I have the Netflix app on my tablet and my phone so entertainment was always at hand. Of course no bed day is complete without a pair of super comfy pyjamas. I don’t know if it is an EDS thing, but all my clothes, including my PJs always feel tight come the end of the day. No-I have not put on 3 lbs during the day, it just happens. So when I was pregnant I always bought jammies a size too big – for maximum comfort. Don’t buy anything fleecy! If your in bed all day, you’ll just end up feeling hot and bothered – and not in the good way!

5.Have faith

As I write this piece I am nursing my little girl. Every time I look at her, I think how she was worth every second of pain, every hip pop, every day stuck in bed, the scary situation were in just before and after birth was worth having her in my life. During the pregnancy, there were days I panicked and thought, this is a mistake, why did I do this? But having Ollie pop here with us has made life so much better! I feel better too, I’m out and about so much more now. I’ve kicked my physio up a notch – her birth gave me an extra push to work hard to make myself as well as possible.

I wish you health and happiness.

Z.M

You just can’t be sick

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Having any disability is difficult but for those who suffer from invisible conditions, it is a constant uphill battle. In addition to fighting their own conditions, they must also face discrimination and feel like they have to prove they are in fact, genuinely disabled.

As the name suggests, invisible disabilities are quite hard to detect, just by looking at someone. You can not tell if someone suffers from migraines, depression or diabetes just by looking at them. While you may have the best intentions, some of the following statements should never be said to someone with a chronic or invisible illness

“But you don’t look sick/But you look so well.”

While you may be trying to make the sufferer feel better, it can often come across as being accusing. Bear in mind that people with invisible illnesses probably hear this on a day-to-day basis. Not all illnesses are obvious and quite often the sufferer just puts on a brave face or you may have caught them on a good day.

“It could be worse, you could have cancer.”

Of course things could be worse, but if the sufferer has a chronic illness that doesn’t have a cure, they will be facing this condition for the rest of their lives and for some, it doesn’t get much worse than that. As for the cancer reference, just don’t..cancer goes one way or another, the person you are talking to may never be cured or won’t die as a result of a condition. Chronic illness means a life time of suffering.

“You should try this, it worked really well for my aunt, uncle, grandfather etc”

Oh this one really grinds my gears…
Again, you may mean well but unless you are a medical professional, or you also suffer from the condition, keep it to yourself. Anybody who suffers from a chronic or invisible condition wants to get better and have probably tried all treatments available to them. The Paleo diet isn’t going to fix faulty genes, or cure depression. And no, vaccines did not give me EDS!!!!

“It must be great not having to work”

My response is usually “😑”

Most people with chronic disabilities would do anything to live a normal life! Everyone wants to be independent and to have a good income to support their families. Being stuck at home all day can also effect a person’s mental state.

“You just need to exercise more”

Of course everyone should be doing some form of regular exercise. Physiotherapy and other exercises are hugely beneficial and important to maintain ones health but, going for a run or taking up a dance class can often make sufferers feel worse, especially if they have something like Autonomic Dysfunction.

“You are too young to be sick”

NEWSFLASH…
You don’t have to be elderly to be sick! You can become ill or stressed no matter what your age. Illness or disability isn’t age-dependent. Saying this to someone with an invisible condition can often make them feel self conscious about their inability to do normal, everyday tasks such as getting out of the house to get the groceries.

“It is all in your head”

Of all the things people with invisible conditions hear, this is undoubtedly the most dangerous. Sadly, not only is it heard from friends and family, sufferers can often hear it from their doctor. It is not uncommon for people suffering from physical disabilities to suffer from mental illness, and all because they were not believed.

But what can be the worst thing of all for someone with an invisible disability is for them to hear nothing at all. Someone who comes across as being totally disinterested, ignores the subject or just nods can be the most hurtful of all.

Things you should say to someone with an invisible or chronic condition.

“I believe you”

This can often be the nicest possible thing someone with an invisible condition will hear. Too often, sufferers will spend years battling with health care professionals to find an answer. When they finally hear “I believe you,” a huge weight will lift from their shoulders.

“I looked up your condition online”

Someone who takes the time to learn about a condition is very much appreciated amongst those with disabilities.

“How can I help?”

Taking a person shopping, for a cup of coffee or bringing them to their appointments can make all the difference. Sometimes someone with a chronic condition doesn’t leave the house for a long time, or misses a lot of school or work.

Adding to the difficultly of their illness is the feeling of being forgotten or left behind. Even if you can’t take time out of your day, a text or a phone call letting them know you are thinking of them may be a small act for you, but a big gesture for the recipient.

“I’m here”

Two very powerful words but, don’t say it unless you mean it.

I hope people who hear these things on a daily basis won’t feel so alone. Sadly, we will face ignorance in our lives. We will come across some moron who harasses you because you have a disability badge on your car. It’s inevitable. Chin up. We may be ‘invisible’ but we still have our voices to educate and create awareness.

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To all the people out there who are skeptical of one’s illness, remember this; never judge a book by its cover. As cheesy as it sounds, it’s true.

So until next time,

Take care of you

Z.M

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Breastfeeding for the Chronically Ill-What you need to know

Breastfeeding has become such a touchy subject for the last few years and when ever it is discussed it inevitably becomes the breast vs bottle debate. Isn’t anybody else tired of this?! I blame the media (yes, I’m a journalist) because they have instigated ‘mommy wars’ in an attempt to generate more likes and followers on social media. I’m not here to debate ‘whether public breastfeeding is acceptable’ or ‘how long is too long?’ If you must know, I believe in breastfeeding to natural term which by the way, is anything up to 7 years of age. Will I feed a 7 year old myself? Probably not. Will I judge a mother who does? No. Her child, her business.

Anyway, this week I am offering some words of advice to chronically ill moms who wish to breastfeed or are thinking about breastfeeding. This is just touching on some points, if you want me to go into detail about anything, feel free to email me hello@thezebramom.com

1. Health benefits for mom

You’re chronically ill. God forbid you end up with any other ailments other than the crappy lifelong illness you are living with. Breastfeeding reduces a mother’s risk of developing certain cancers, diabetes as well bone conditions such as osteoporosis.

2. Health benefits for baby

“Exclusive breastfeeding for six months has many benefits for the infant and mother. Chief among these is protection against gastrointestinal infections which is observed not only in developing but also industrialized countries. Early initiation of breastfeeding, within one hour of birth, protects the newborn from acquiring infections and reduces newborn mortality. The risk of mortality due to diarrhoea and other infections can increase in infants who are either partially breastfed or not breastfed at all” (WHO)

If your condition is genetic, like mine, you may wonder whether it is worth breastfeeding at all. Absolutely, it is. Again, breastfeeding reduces your child’s chances of developing a massive range of illness and chronic conditions such as diabetes. Breastmilk is the perfect food for your baby. Anything else compromises their gut flora and may lead to problems such as coeliac disease and other food allergies.

3. Breastfeeding is the easier, less exhausting option

The first six weeks are tough and you feel like you are just feeding all day long. This is totally normal and necessary. For the first six weeks your baby is trying to establish your milk supply. Best thing to do is just sit back, relax and enjoy the time with baby. Think about how exhausting it would be if you had to prepare formula, sterilise, wash bottles etc. And the night feeds, Jeez! Having to get up in the middle of the night to make a bottle and wait for it to cool down, that is exhausting. I formula fed Bendy Boy and honestly, I was like a zombie.

After the six week mark your supply will settle and you will have a couple of hours between feeds to go about your day. Cosleeping is also really great for sick breastfeeding moms who need the extra sleep (if you are on medications that make you sleepy you will not be able to cosleep) Baby is close by that you can just pop boob in his/her mouth and you can drift back to sleep. Studies show breastfeeding and cosleeping moms get more sleep.

 

Breastfeedingfor the chronically ill-2

4. It’s free and always ready to go.

If your condition has caused you to give up work, you might not have the funds to buy formula every week. You’re talking on average a tub of formula is €12. That’s €624 a year! Never mind the cost of bottles, sterilisers and electricity costs.

5. You can breastfeed on medications

I am a massive fan or Dr Jack Newman. He has been a Godsend for me when it comes to getting information on medications. Many misinformed health care professionals will tell you that you can’t breastfeed while on medications. This is not true at all. I am taking Tramadol and and Midodrene for pain and low BP. If you’re not sure about your own medications, check out the Lactmed app for android and iPhone, contact the Breastfeeding and Medications Facebook page or check out Wendy Jones’ factsheets on her website.

Paediatrician Dr Jack Newman, IBLC says:

“There is almost no drug that requires a mother to interrupt breastfeeding. The real question is which is safer for the baby: Breastfeeding with tiny amounts of drug in the milk (and it is almost always tiny) or formula? Clearly, in the majority of cases it is safer for the baby to breastfeed.”

Breastfeeding doesn’t have to be all or nothing. Every drop counts. If you can’t breastfeed yourself, the World Health Organisation recommends:

Milk from a wet-nurse, or
Milk from a milk bank, or
Breastmilk substitute (formula) fed by cup.

I expressed for my daughter for the first six weeks as she was severely tongue tied. I also used donor milk on a couple of occasions.

6. If you’re having trouble, go to a lactation expert

You go to see a cardiology consultant for your heart, a rheumatology consultant for your bones and joints so why would you not see a lactation consultant for breastfeeding? Breastfeeding is a learned skill and all mothers need help in the early days. Sadly, there is a huge lack of knowledge amongst health professionals when it comes to breastfeeding. Most health care professionals have little to no formal training in lactation (even a lot of midwives provide inaccurate information) so you will need to get in touch with an IBCLC or Le Leche League. Breastfeeding should not hurt and despite what some doctors (and the Fed is Best Foundation) might say just 1-2% of women will not produce enough milk. There are even some who say that some babies “just don’t the like milk” or that their baby is allergic to breastmilk (this is extremely rare and it’s far more likely your baby has a cow protein intolerance). Even if your supply is low, there are many things an IBCLC will help you to do to get your supply up such as a supplementary feeding system. If you are find breastfeeding difficult, do contact an expert as soon as possible to avoid further problems. There are so many myths out there so it’s important to talk to someone with extensive training.

If you have any questions, please feel free to comment below. I will do my best to help.

Until the next time,

Z.M

Tongue tie DOES affect breastfeeding

 

I never thought I’d be brave enough to share this photo but after much encouragement from friends to share my story, I apprehensively upload it. If it helps one woman get through a rough patch, then it is worth any possible embarrassment. This was me when my little girl, Ollie was three weeks old. I was exhausted, actually I was beyond exhausted. I was a zombie trying to disguise myself as a functioning member of society. I was pumping every two hours to get what little breast milk I had to feed my precious little girl. She had an anterior tongue tie that meant she could not physically latch.

After she was born, I knew something wasn’t right. Her latch felt shallow. “I’m pretty sure she has a tongue tie,” I said to the midwife. The midwife glanced inside my baby’s mouth. “No, no, she doesn’t.” As if I was some silly little girl that didn’t know what she was talking about. This isn’t my first experience of tongue tie, lady.

The next three days in hospital were the worst of my life. I began expressing colostrum. One of the younger midwives was very kind and helped me. While I hand expressed milk, she knelt beside me with a syringe and sucked it all up. My baby was having on average 1ml an hour. That didn’t worry me though as I knew baby’s tummy could only hold only a few millilitres at a time anyway. There was a suggestion of giving her formula. At that time I said “If her blood sugars are low, we will talk about it.” Her blood sugars were fine so I continued pumping every hour on the hour. I was exhausted but I was determined to get through this.

 

Formula was mentioned another couple of times so I was eager to get the f**k out of that hospital. If I wanted to breastfeed no way was I going to be successful stuck in there, with half arsed support. I knew my daughter had a tongue tie and the midwives were clueless, shoving my daughter’s face into my breast in frustration.

I rang a private lactation consultant who I had a good relationship with through my work as a health reporter. She confirmed that baby had a significant tongue tie and that it would need to be clipped.

We travelled an hour away and paid €200 to have my daughter’s tongue tie clipped. It was the most expensive two seconds of my life. The GP who performed the procedure said that it was one of the worst anterior tongue ties she had ever seen and that my daughter’s tongue was pretty much non functioning.

 

 

Those words..non functioning. Meaning my daughter would have had a plethora of problems later on, including her speech. Now, imagine if I wasn’t as well informed and educated and I had been and I had taken the midwife’s word that my daughter’s latch was fine. Imagine I wasn’t determined to breastfeed. I would have given up within the first 2 days. The only reason I was so well informed this time is because I found out my son had a posterior tongue tie when he was 3. I only managed to breastfeed him for 2 weeks. Feeding with his tongue tie caused my nipples to blister, bleed and crack. I cried at the very thought of feeding him.

 

After the tongue tie was clipped, my baby’s latch was getting better and better. As Dr Jack Newman says “babies learn to breastfeed by breastfeeding.” It was just a matter of time and practice for the two of us. I was continuing to pump still as it takes up to 2 weeks for baby to learn how to latch again.

By 6 weeks she was exclusively on the boob and we were both so happy. I was so happy to sleep again! Instead of waking up every two hours to pump a couple of ounces, I kept baby close in bed with me. When she woke, it was just a case of popping boob out, latching her on and drifting back to sleep.

 

There is no doubt that tongue tie affects infant feeding. It can affect bottle fed babies too! There is a question over whether lip tie affects feeding but anecdotal and some scientific evidence suggests it might. It needs to be explored further.

Both my children have lip tie. Ollie’s lip tie is pretty significant but it doesn’t affect our feeding, thankfully. You’ll notice the people with significant lip tie immediately, they have a gap between their two front teeth.

The thing is, I’m not angry at the staff in the maternity hospital for letting me down. I’m angry at the whole system. Our health care professionals including midwives, public health nurses, dentists, consultants and GPs all need training on this subject. Too many women are being fobbed off and it is affecting the health of our children. It’s also costing the government €12 million a year! That’s how much we would save if all Irish women breastfed. But, at present we are doomed to fail. Things won’t change until support is increased and training is up to date amongst health care workers.

If my story rings any bells please do not beat yourself up for not being able to breastfeed. Don’t feel guilty, feel angry! You were let down! Once you come to this realisation you can use your own experiences to help other mothers. Breastfeeding is a learned and skill and yes its bloody hard in those first few weeks but it isn’t meant to hurt! No matter what your aunt, grandmother or friend says. If breastfeeding hurt, we would have never survived as a species. Think about it for a second.

If you are having trouble breastfeeding please contact Le Leche League or a lactation consultant.

Without my lactation consultant, I would have never made it to this milestone of six months. The help is out there, go seek it.

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You know you’re breastfeeding when..Part 2

1) The sound of any crying child makes you a) unclasp your bra and b) start leaking uncontrollably.

Yep, you’re in the changing room getting dried after a dip in the pool. As you hurriedly rub yourself dry with the towel, a nearby child begins to cry. There it is, let down..sh*t! Grab the towel and press your boobs in to stop the spray of milk!

2) You find yourself smiling at other people breastfeeding younger babies in public even though you don’t know them.

You walk by a seating area in the food court and see a mum and her bub having a mid shop feed. You smile and nod your head. A silent “kudos” to your peer. You appreciate a mother feeding in public. Later you’ll be gushing to your hubby or other BF friends about what you saw, you might even go searching for the mum on an online support group..stalker..

3) You go to sleep with a bra and pjs but wake up topless from half asleep feeding/co sleeping

Winter is coming…you know what that means! No, not white walkers..ya big nerd..

It means new jammies! Fluffy jammies! Flannel jammies! Basically, women LOVE new pjs but, unless it buttons down, you might as well go to bed topless. Cosleeping while breastfeeding is the best damn thing ever. Baby stirs for a feed, you pop her on the boob and you drift back to sleep. It’s freaking awesome. Cause I’m all about them zzzzzzzzzzzs

4) Eating twice the weight of your baby in one sitting because you ‘need’ the extra calories

I think this meme says it all:

 

DON’T JUDGE ME, K!?

5) You’re child tries to latch on to inanimate boobs

 

So, you are in a Debenhams dressing room and your toddler goes up to a poster of a beautiful model wearing only underwear and tries to nurse from the woman in the poster. BOOOOOBBBBBSSSS…all loyalty out the window..

6) Your milk drunk baby has an awful lot in common with your drunk drunk husband. Falling asleep at the boob then waking up with an incoherent babble and trying to motorboat you.

There is nothing funnier than daddy holding baby, you then walk in topless and both of them grin like cheshire cats. It’s cute when baby gets excited at the mere sight of boob. Not so much when Daddy does it..

7) You can say “nipple twiddling” without a flinch of embarrassment or innuendo.

Before you started breastfeeding breasts and nipples were something to be hidden away. Like two great big vaginas just sitting on your chest and their only function was to please the opposite sex…or so society told you. Now? Talking about your breasts and *whispers* nipples is like talking about your left hand. As for the nipple twidling..may I suggest a breastfeeding necklace? It’ll save you a lot of pain and unsightly scratches from those blasted razor sharp baby nails.

8) You have developed the skill of pumping and typing.

Working mums are entitled to pumping breaks up until their baby is six months old and after that, you could get that booby juice out in your own time. This is something we really to change here in Ireland. The WHO and the HSE (Health Service Executive) recommends that children be breast fed until at least age two. How are working mothers supposed to achieve this? Huh, huh, huh? Tell me, Mr Vadakar, how are we to adhere to the recommendations if there are no proper policies in the workplace to facilitate pumping breaks after six months?

9) Baby wakes up with the sound of your bra clicking back on

FML.

10) Your nipples are more stretchy than you ever imagined.

 

Am I right?

Six reasons why you should use cloth nappies

 

Older generations of Irish people will remember the use of cloth nappies. Traditionally, cloth diapers consisted of a folded square or rectangle of fabric such as linen and fastened with safety pins.
Anecdotes from years ago tell us that using cloth to dress baby’s bum was a painstaking process of boiling, washing and drying. When disposable nappies were introduced in the 1950s, mothers everywhere rejoiced. However, cloth nappies are making a comeback and for very good reasons. Yvonne Evans explains why.

Tradition…with a twist
1) Using cloth nappies does not mean going back to safety pins and folding, like the parents of pre-1950. Cloth nappies are more convenient than ever featuring velcro and poppers for easy fitting. They are soft, made from organic materials and come in a massive range of sizes and colours.

Saving the earth..
2) Disposable nappies contribute to four per cent of our landfill usage and take approximately 500 years to decompose. Even eco-friendly nappies, which, can be purchased in health food stores, take a long time to decompose.
It is estimated that 600,000 nappies are used in Ireland everyday, and 94 per cent of which end up in our landfills. One baby will create 2.5 tonnes of waste; go through approximately 4,000-8,000 nappies over two years. County Councils all over Ireland are calling parents to start using cloth nappies over disposables.
Disposable nappies contain a plethora of chemicals such as plastics and perfumes, which have a major negative impact on the environment. Despite instructions on the packaging, most people incorrectly throw disposable nappies, with the poo still inside, straight into the bin.

While decomposing, the human waste lets off methane, one of the most damaging of the greenhouse gases, and may even pollute the groundwater. To keep your baby in disposable nappies until they are potty trained, 4.5 trees will be sacrificed.

Unpleasant odors..
3) Let’s face it, nappies stink! Despite what you might think, modern cloth nappies actually smell far less than disposables. On average, you will use five nappies a day, that’s 35 per week. With bin collections generally only taking place once a week, that means you may have a very stinky kitchen or bathroom for a few days! Gross..

Let it snow! Wait…what?!
4) Ten years ago and more, the absorbency in disposables came from wood pulp. This is no longer the case, except for the cheapest of own-brands. The nappies have indeed decreased in size, but that is because super-absorbency granules have replaced the wood pulp in them. Essentially, the same product as you can buy in your garden centre to add to the soil to improve water retention. It’s also the same stuff Hollywood uses to make fake snow! Disposable nappies are largely believed to contain chemicals and materials that may irritate your baby’s skin. Nappy rash is a common complaint amongst parents who purchase disposable nappies, something cloth parents don’t usually complain of.

Cloth nappies keep newborns hips slightly wider apart than disposables do, but this is actually the optimum position for a newborn. When a baby is born, their hip joints haven’t fully developed, and at their six-eight week check, the doctor will check for ‘clicky hips’ or hip dysplasia. If baby has clicky hips, they often need to wear a hip harness. This harness keeps their legs wider apart so that the hip ball and socket joint are held in a deeper position and can develop properly. This usually helps prevent the need for hip operations later on.  Cloth nappies don’t have the hips in as wide a position as a hip harness, but the extra width and support cloth nappies provide can sometimes prevent the need for a hip harness at all.

Potty time!
Another health benefit to using cloth nappies is that children who wear them generally tend to potty train faster. Cloth wearing children are more aware of being wet and recognise the sensation of urinating much earlier on.

It’s all about the money
6) Keeping your child in disposable nappies for three years may cost you between a thousand and two thousand Euros, depending on the brand and how frequently your child needs changing. Disposables can never be reused so you will spend at least €1,000 on your second and subsequent children.
The beauty of cloth is that you can buy and sell ‘pre loved’ nappies. Even with laundry costs, cloth nappying is still the cheaper option in the long run. Cloth nappies come in a variety of sizes, colours and print. The most economical type of cloth nappies is the birth to potty types. These nappies can be used when your child is a newborn right up until potty training age. Approximately 20 cloth nappies is all you need for your little one’s first two years of life.

You just need to look at cloth nappies to see just how much more attractive they are! Whether you are into cupcakes and rainbows or Game of Thrones, there is a nappy to suit everyone’s taste. Cloth nappying often becomes a hobby for many parents, collecting rare and limited edition prints.

Personally, I use birth to potty Flip nappies and Tiny Nipper wraps. They are so versatile! You can use virtually anything as an insert, a towel, a muslin, anything! They are great for babies with little legs like my Ollie.

For more information see clothnappylibrary.ie or the Facebook page ‘Cloth Nappy Library Ireland.’